Padleducks logo Paddleducks name

Welcome to Paddleducks..... The home of paddle steamer modelling enthusiasts from around the world.



+-

Main Menu

Home
About Us
Forum
Photo Gallery
Links
Contact Us

UserBox

Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
 
 
 
Forgot your password?

Search



Advanced Search

Author Topic: DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE  (Read 193621 times)

Offline djcf

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 581
  • Gender: Male
Re: DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
« Reply #330 on: October 04, 2010, 07:52:49 AM »
Hi Geoff,
Good to see the enthusiasm...she will be ready for next paddler day :D (thats my deadline for my build!)

Found this part of a plan for Duchess of Fife.... doesn't show to much detail, but there is some sort of chain stop, maybe the "Duke" had a similar set up? If I get stuck for a detail, I look at similar vessels for a clue.

Will let you know if I find any pics etc

Clark

Offline Eddy Matthews

  • Administrator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4985
  • Gender: Male
Re: DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
« Reply #331 on: October 04, 2010, 08:18:21 AM »
Geoff,

Normally the anchor chain would come up through a hawser on the side of the hull, then the chain would run across the deck to the anchor winch/capstan, and from there down another pipe into the chain locker below....

Hope that helps?

Eddy
~ Never, ever, argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level and beat you with experience ~

Offline derekwarner_decoy

  • Paddleducks Supporter
  • Senior Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2518
  • Gender: Male
  • Wollongong - Australia
Re: DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
« Reply #332 on: October 04, 2010, 10:06:45 AM »
Hi PD's...... :whistle ...Geoff.....in your snaps pict0031.jpg & pict0002.jpg you display the earlier variant of a hawser pipe which is simply a robust cast iron horizontal reinforcement ring forged back into the [in this case] cast iron bulwark plates on either side of the bow sprit

Then as Eddy suggests ....."then the chain would run across the deck to the anchor winch/capstan, and from there down another pipe into the chain locker below"....

You have correctly displayed two of these ....robust cast iron horizontal reinforcement ring  :goodnews ....as one was used for mooring ropes & the other usually the anchor

You need to ensure that [in a plan view] the anchor chain has a 180 degree turn/bite on the winch/capstan drum....this will naturally off set the entry point to the chain locker..... :goodluck

If fordeck space permits... :sobbing ....you could also add a chain stopper which locks   :hammer the chain just outby of the cast iron entry point to the chain locker ..... :shhh ...but naturally this stops the anchor+chain from paying out...... :c002 when underway.........Derek  :beer

« Last Edit: October 04, 2010, 10:12:26 AM by derekwarner_decoy »
Derek Warner

Honorary Secretary [Retired]
Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op
Australia
www.ils.org.au

Offline derekwarner_decoy

  • Paddleducks Supporter
  • Senior Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2518
  • Gender: Male
  • Wollongong - Australia
Re: DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
« Reply #333 on: October 04, 2010, 10:21:36 AM »
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm....just thinking here PD's  :nono .......did the DoD actually have an anchor chain...or did the crew simply hoist the anchor  via the rope block & tackle as shown at the bow  :a102 ...I don't know  :shhh.....Derek 
« Last Edit: October 04, 2010, 10:25:53 AM by derekwarner_decoy »
Derek Warner

Honorary Secretary [Retired]
Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op
Australia
www.ils.org.au

Offline derekwarner_decoy

  • Paddleducks Supporter
  • Senior Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2518
  • Gender: Male
  • Wollongong - Australia
Re: DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
« Reply #334 on: October 04, 2010, 02:32:12 PM »
RGY....just a guess here.....  :darn .... couldn't find a snap of DofD with an anchor......but here is a snap of PS Consul

 :picknose ....not sure....could there have been a rope hand winch for the anchor on the forecastle that the crew simply would wind in or let out?  :shhh ....& then the anchor it self secured with the chain when heaved in & stowed away? ...or as per the snap?  :beer
Derek Warner

Honorary Secretary [Retired]
Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op
Australia
www.ils.org.au

Offline R.G.Y.

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 828
  • Gender: Male
Re: DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
« Reply #335 on: October 04, 2010, 08:01:54 PM »
Thank you all for your thoughts. :bravo There is very little space at the bow which is what started me wondering. :-\ I tend to agree with Derek (just for once ;)) the rope idea seems right.  As the design was very old fashioned even for 1890, and a lot of features correspond to west country schooner practice. Also as Derek said there are no pictures showing a chain going over the bulwarks. It would be rare for Duke to require an anchor, landing at piers or on the beach. Except the kedge when run up on the beach, for which piles of rope can be seen.  Off course the Consul had 2 rebuild by the time of the photo. Geoff
« Last Edit: October 04, 2010, 08:04:46 PM by R.G.Y. »
G.Y.

Offline derekwarner_decoy

  • Paddleducks Supporter
  • Senior Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2518
  • Gender: Male
  • Wollongong - Australia
Re: DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
« Reply #336 on: October 04, 2010, 09:02:48 PM »
Oh dear PD's...... :gathering ....RGY says...... "it would be rare for Duke to require an anchor"   :nono ....

 :a102.......surely British mercantile laws would have required such a fine vessel of ample tonnage to have [had] an anchor to avert a risk of life in an emergency circumstance.......... whilst all the fare paying  passengers :vacation were slipping their G&T in the saloon bar....... :tongue1 ......

BTW... Geoff.....what is the kedge/a kedge?...........Derek
« Last Edit: October 04, 2010, 09:05:55 PM by derekwarner_decoy »
Derek Warner

Honorary Secretary [Retired]
Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op
Australia
www.ils.org.au

Offline R.G.Y.

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 828
  • Gender: Male
Re: DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
« Reply #337 on: October 05, 2010, 01:21:28 AM »
Derek, I am not suggesting there would be no anchor at all !!  After I agreed with you as well  :nono). May be I should have said use an anchor.  Just that it would be secured inside the bulwarks, with out the rope or chain connected  permanently. As for a kedge ( may be I can't spell) is a smaller anchor usually deployed from the stern. On the duke and Duchess used to hold the ship square to the beach when driven ashore to embark or disembark passengers. A very dubious practice which wrecked the Duchess, as you probable know. BWT Whats G&T we drink scrumpy (proper zider) in the west country. No one cares whats happening after a couple of pints. :beer G EoF ffaery
« Last Edit: October 05, 2010, 01:30:53 AM by R.G.Y. »
G.Y.

Offline mjt60a

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1698
  • Gender: Male
Re: DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
« Reply #338 on: October 05, 2010, 02:15:45 AM »
don't know for certain but I would expect something like this..
Posted by Mick.
(.....gonna need a bigger boat.....)

Offline mjt60a

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1698
  • Gender: Male
Re: DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
« Reply #339 on: October 05, 2010, 02:19:43 AM »
so far as I can tell...
the screw handle next to the chain is to lock it so it can't slip and the lever to the right disengages the chain sprockets so the windlass can still be used with ropes (for mooring)
on older ships where the anchor doesnt fit into the hull (picture is from tattershall castle, where it does) the anchor seems to have been lifted onto the deck using a davit, if it wasn't likely to be needed...
« Last Edit: October 05, 2010, 02:23:23 AM by mjt60a »
Posted by Mick.
(.....gonna need a bigger boat.....)

Offline R.G.Y.

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 828
  • Gender: Male
Re: DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
« Reply #340 on: October 05, 2010, 07:55:02 AM »
Thanks Mick but I do know there is only a steam capstan on Duke, Both forward & aft.  As I have said she was very old fashioned. Geoff
G.Y.

Offline R.G.Y.

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 828
  • Gender: Male
Re: DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
« Reply #341 on: October 06, 2010, 02:57:18 AM »
The boss gave me permission to buy her present for me on my birthday . See P1)
So I have had a play. Made the navigation lights. Started with 7/16th brass hexagon bar. Turned out of center ( to lazy to change to 4 jaw chuck ) so packed one jaw. P2)  The lamp in the photo is the stern light so I kept the round section, milling off the remainder of the hexagon and drill 1/4in hole in the flat. Finish machining by parting off an drill hole in center of the bottom to fit LED. P3) The mast head light made the same with 1/16th tube soldered on each side. P4) Port & starboard had 2 flats @ 90 deg: The complete set in with the source of the LEDs P5)
« Last Edit: October 06, 2010, 06:11:11 AM by R.G.Y. »
G.Y.

Offline R.G.Y.

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 828
  • Gender: Male
Re: DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
« Reply #342 on: October 06, 2010, 03:11:25 AM »
Lost the photo of the finished items here it is. after painting the red & green on the LEDs i set them in clear bath silicone. This is smoothed in with a coffee stirring stick, then smoothed off  & the excess using a rag dipped in white spirit. Geoff
« Last Edit: October 18, 2010, 03:04:04 AM by R.G.Y. »
G.Y.

Offline R.G.Y.

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 828
  • Gender: Male
Re: DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
« Reply #343 on: October 06, 2010, 10:50:42 PM »
Last post for 10 days, off to Las Vegas. :08
 :great  But I have the filigree sorted. Cut out of an old box. Geoff
G.Y.

Offline mjt60a

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1698
  • Gender: Male
Re: DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
« Reply #344 on: October 06, 2010, 11:47:42 PM »
very impressed with the lights, mine are much more basic - just brass tube with a square hole filed in one side and a piece of styrene stuck in the top...
Posted by Mick.
(.....gonna need a bigger boat.....)

 

Powered by EzPortal