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Author Topic: Drive system for Graupner Glasgow  (Read 4611 times)

GreeboTheCat

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Drive system for Graupner Glasgow
« on: April 18, 2008, 07:42:48 PM »
I've just ordered the Glasgow kit (plus Graupner paddlewheel set) and am looking for some advice about a suitable drive train. Have decided to go electric again (having just finished a steam launch) and would like some advice. I want independent drive to the paddlewheels so 2 motors and (probably) belt drive. Has anybody out there got a reasonably generic specification for such a setup?

For example:

2 geared (possible MFA) motors but what gear ratios are best?
2 controllers (15, 20, 25 ?)
2 belt drives/toothed wheel setups (are the Maplin sets any good?)
I'm guessing that Gel Cell batteries are best in that you get good ballasting for free.

I realise that many of these things are up to personal preference/availability but any and all suggestions will be gratefully studied.

cheers

Greebo

Offline Eddy Matthews

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Re: Drive system for Graupner Glasgow
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2008, 08:17:41 PM »
I've used the MFA motors in the past and they work well, for a sidewheeler, use the 50:1 919D501 for 158 RPM (no load) at 6v, or the 100:1 919D1001 for 158 RPM (no load) at 12v.

The 540 motors (listed above) are much better than the smaller 380 sized units as they have much more torque.

15A controllers will be fine, no need to go for a higher current rating than that with those motors.

Use Gell Cell batteries, as they will help with ballast, but check the size as there isn't a huge amount of space to get things into a Graupner Glasgow. Go for the largest capacity that you can squeeze in.

I don't have any experience with the MFA drive pulleys/belts etc, so I cannot comment on those....

Regards
Eddy
~ Never, ever, argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level and beat you with experience ~

Offline chipmonk

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Re: Drive system for Graupner Glasgow
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2008, 02:11:13 AM »
Hi there
I have also built a Glasgow and found that exposed gears tend to be noisy. I used the plastic chain and sprockets from "Squires" and found them to be very good. As to steering, I didn't use fully independent speed controllers. You can use one and run the output through a micro switch switcher to stop, and then reverse the inside paddle. They are connected to the rudder servo. I have a drawing somewhere if anyone in interested?
Cheers Chris Monk.
"While you're here, can you just"

Offline scotfriend

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Re: Drive system for Graupner Glasgow
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2008, 12:48:01 AM »
Hi all,

look at my topic "Independent paddledrive for my Glasgow" i bought the motors, the toothed wheels and the belt`s from Lemosolar, this is a German company who sells a lot of small motors and other parts like wheels and belts for different things.

The internet address is www.lemo-solar.de
The e-mail address is, vertrieb@lemo-solar.de

Unfortunately the site is only in English, if you need help, don`t hesitate to ask me.

Regards Hans
When i read about the evils of drinking, I decide to give up reading

GreeboTheCat

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Re: Drive system for Graupner Glasgow
« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2008, 06:50:36 PM »
Hi there Hans,
I was interested in getting some of the motors, toothed wheels and drive belts from the company Lemo-Solar and your post said that the site was only in English but I think you meant only in German  ;) and as my German language is non-existant, I was hoping you could guide me to the correct part of the site and maybe even list the items you bought for your Glasgow.
Many thanks in advance.

Paul

Offline Eddy Matthews

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Re: Drive system for Graupner Glasgow
« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2008, 06:53:01 PM »
Hans is on holiday right now Paul.... I'm not sure how long he is away for (two weeks I think?), but I'm sure he'll respond when he gets back.

Eddy
~ Never, ever, argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level and beat you with experience ~

bogstandard

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Re: Drive system for Graupner Glasgow
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2008, 02:27:15 AM »
Not to hijack the other post about Graupner paddle wheels, I have answered Greebos question in his last post in here.

The paddlewheel pins, if stuck in with superglue are perfectly OK. Mine were stuck in over twelve years ago, and the model still sails with its new owner almost every weekend. None have ever moved.

I found a bit of a rigidity problem with the paddle boxes, I thought they were flimsy. So I put a length of 3/16" carbon fibre rod thru the hull at the front and back of the paddle boxes, underneath, where it couldn't easily be seen, and fixed the boxes to it. You could now lift the finished boat by the boxes and it wouldn't flex at all.

The paddle boxes also show a major design flaw. If built as per the plans (mine anyway), after a couple of minutes running, the decks would be awash with water. So taking advice from a friend who had already built one and suffered from this problem, I installed a splash guard inside the paddle box, between the paddles and outer hull, to prevent the water going near the suspect joint. It was only made from 5 thou plasticard, but cured the problem completely.

Put the transfers of the paddlebox freeing ports on, and then cut out the holes. I was lucky, and did it on my milling machine. But when sailing it does make all the difference, it never goes lopsided due to water hanging in the paddle boxes, and it also looks very scale seeing the water coming out of the sides.

I powered mine with two independent geared motors, a mixer and a pair of matched Robbe speed controllers. It can pivot about a point between the paddles with no fwds/back movement. Not scale, but it can get you out of some very sticky situations.

As far as I can remember, I accurately cut a larger access hole for the rudder area at the back, just in case problems occurred. What I definitely did was to tighten the rudder arm fixing screw so it only just held. The rudder is in a very vulnerable position. By having it only just nipped, if the rudder was banged, there would be no damage to the linkage and it could be realigned very easily.

The deck all depends on how dirty you are when working. The first thing I did with mine was to seal the printed faces (also the underneath as well, people forget about that and leave it unprotected, and wonder why the deck is twisting when it gets a bit damp) before it went anywhere near the boat, that way, if you did spill something on it, the printing wouldn't be damaged. It does look OK when fitted, and unless you want a super quality look to it, I wouldn't bother with individual planking, but it could be done if you wanted to.

No matter what Graupner say, it isn't a true scale model, sort of semi scale, and the only photo you will find, is when it had been sold, renamed, and converted to a paddle trawler. It also shows it with different shaped freeing ports on the paddle boxes, not the horizontal ones as in the kit.  Unfortunately the picture was in a small monthly issue of I think 'Ships', and I gave that away years ago.

Here is a link to some pictures of mine (under new ownership)

http://creweanddistrictmodelboatclub.org.uk/html/paddlers.html

Hope this has helped

John
« Last Edit: May 01, 2008, 05:45:13 AM by bogstandard »

Offline Eddy Matthews

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Re: Drive system for Graupner Glasgow
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2008, 07:35:44 PM »
A well thought out reply John, thanks....

I saw you start to post your message, went away to watch a TV programme for an hour, only to find you still posting the same message when I got back - I thought you were writing a novel  :whistle

Some really nice paddlers on the link you gave too - As well as your Glasgow, there's a model of Waverley, and a Zulu sternwheeler...

Regards
Eddy
~ Never, ever, argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level and beat you with experience ~

GreeboTheCat

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Re: Drive system for Graupner Glasgow
« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2008, 08:03:14 PM »
Lots of REALLY useful stuff in your posting John, I shall be taking notice of all the points you raised, many thanks. :great :respect :terrific

Paul

bogstandard

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Re: Drive system for Graupner Glasgow
« Reply #9 on: May 01, 2008, 05:43:39 AM »
Greebo,

Glad it has helped, if I remember anything else, I will post it.
Just one thing, with all the abs hulls I have ever built, I poured some resin into the curve between the bow and the keel, after first roughing the area up, not a lot, maybe 1/2" deep at the deepest point. What this does, if you sail a lot in the winter, if you bang into something with a normal thin abs hull they tend to split because of the cold. Because I always did this on all my boats, mine were used as icebreakers, and never had any problems.

Eddy,

The reason I was so long posting, was because I was doing it in the graupner paddle wheels post, then realised about Greebos help post, so I moved it all over to there and modified it slightly.

BTW, that was the Zulu I mentioned about being the same one, when you brought it up about being advertised on ebay.


John

 

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