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Author Topic: Stability  (Read 18441 times)

Rob Bruce

  • Guest
Re: Stability
« Reply #30 on: February 06, 2009, 08:03:22 AM »
Re: hull I plan to use for small paddle wheeler.
At this stage it will be either a re-worked "Firecrest". I have drawn up the offset tables for this little 15 foot design but with a wider beam (we don't have to negotiate locks and canals down-under). This will need checking with full size lofting prior to building.
Or a re-worked "Lily" a 20 footer which I will shorten to suit. Glyn Lancaster Jones the designer has offered to send me some working drawings.
The final product may well a combination of the two designs to suit. No rush as it is summer here 30C during the day. Have to slip and tidy up my houseboat, finish off an outrigger canoe I am building, build a new workshop then get on to the little paddle wheeler. So much for retirement.
Rob

Offline Bierjunge

  • Full Member
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  • Posts: 178
  • Gender: Male
Re: Stability
« Reply #31 on: February 09, 2009, 01:23:30 AM »
Let me return to the very beginning of this thread:

Quote from: thewharfonline
I was always lead to believe wheels made the boat more stable on the side...I don't know if this is only rumour though.

Exactly the oppossite Sean! The paddlewheels etc add no extra floatation, (...)

Well, if so, how do you then explain that THIS works:
http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1264237/jeep_vs_snowmobile_race_over_water/
 :o

This vehicle does not even have a hull for any floatation, it does get its stability entirely by its paddlewheels. They obviously don't have the tendency to dig into the water, in contrary, they seem to create an upward force the deeper they are immersed.
So why should a paddler with a hull behave much different...  ???

Offline steamboatmodel

  • Senior Member
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  • Posts: 803
  • Gender: Male
Re: Stability
« Reply #32 on: February 09, 2009, 02:07:52 AM »
Let me return to the very beginning of this thread:

Quote from: thewharfonline
I was always lead to believe wheels made the boat more stable on the side...I don't know if this is only rumour though.

Exactly the oppossite Sean! The paddlewheels etc add no extra floatation, (...)

Well, if so, how do you then explain that THIS works:
http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1264237/jeep_vs_snowmobile_race_over_water/
 :o

This vehicle does not even have a hull for any floatation, it does get its stability entirely by its paddlewheels. They obviously don't have the tendency to dig into the water, in contrary, they seem to create an upward force the deeper they are immersed.
So why should a paddler with a hull behave much different...  ???

Have you ever skipped a stone across water? That is how the ones in the video work there is NO stability from the paddlewheels, and if they dig in too deep they sink.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQRyWnr44Sg
Regards,
Gerald
Be wary of strong drink. It can make you shoot at tax collectors--and miss. Lazarus Long

Offline mjt60a

  • Senior Member
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  • Posts: 1698
  • Gender: Male
Re: Stability
« Reply #33 on: February 09, 2009, 07:41:32 AM »
looked to me that those vehicles work in a similar way to that a waterskier does (or maybe a hydrofoil) I notice they build up a lot of speed on land before entering the water but what would happen if they stopped before reaching the other side?????
As for the idea of sponsons adding stability, I expect what was meant was that should the boat be caused to tilt to one side or other, the sponson acts like another hull preventing the boat from rolling any further...
Posted by Mick.
(.....gonna need a bigger boat.....)

 

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