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Author Topic: Engel Typhoon  (Read 6624 times)

ajg141

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Engel Typhoon
« on: October 24, 2005, 07:07:19 AM »
To keep Eddy happy  :D  - and probably bore the rest of you, here are a few pics of my Typhoon under construction and as displayed recently at the Edinburgh Model Boat Club annual regatta. The build is now entering its third year and there are still 1 or 2 things to finalise before the first test launch. This assumes there is water back in our pond! This is a superb kit but to be honest I probably took on something that was beyond my ability. I've had to learn an awful lot of new techniques to get this far. One point is that the build is so slow that I've built various other simpler things in the interim - whilst continuing to sail my old Southern Belle of course.

Andrew

Offline Eddy Matthews

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Engel Typhoon
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2005, 07:36:28 AM »
A real work of art Andrew, thanks for the photos - Some of them give a clear indication of just how BIG the Typhoon is, truely a monster!

I for one can't wait to see how she performs on (and under) the water. I hope you'll keep us posted on your progress...
~ Never, ever, argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level and beat you with experience ~

Offline Eddy Matthews

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Engel Typhoon
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2005, 08:05:01 AM »
One thing I noticed Andrew was just how small the ballast tanks appear compared to the size of the hull! The model must sit very low in the water compared to the full sized vessel (a problem with a lot of model subs), so just out of curiosity, is there enough space to fit 4 ballast tanks?

I don't expect you to do it, but I'm sure that would make the model more realistic when on the surface...
~ Never, ever, argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level and beat you with experience ~

ajg141

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Engel Typhoon
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2005, 08:22:46 AM »
Eddy

There's no way you could get 4 tanks in there - at  least not without building a new wtc. Scarcely enough room for the wiring! The tanks are 750ml  and a lot of lead ballast is used to keep the beast  fairly low in the water. I also suspect the wiring for 4 tanks would baffle me - I had enough trouble with 2. All I know is that it's a heavy and difficult to manhandle and will probably take 2 people to launch! I must put it on the scales to find its current all-up weight!

Andrew

Offline derekwarner_decoy

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Engel Typhoon
« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2005, 04:38:13 PM »
Hi PD’s – Andrew – in snap imgP0031a.jpg I can see the cable that has control of the dive planes to elevate or lower the plane angle, and also see another control linkage [push pull brass line & pivots] which appears to link each of the plane mechanisms in the vertical plane  
   
My geometry is OK but I have no real knowledge of submarine diving or guidance/maneuvering systems – what is the purpose of the second mentioned control - Derek  
         
 
From: ajg141 [mailto:submarines@paddleducks.co.uk]
 Sent: Monday, 24 October 2005 7:07 AM
 To: submarines@paddleducks.co.uk
 Subject: Engel Typhoon  
 
   
To keep Eddy happy - and probably bore the rest of you, here are a few pics of my Typhoon under construction…….. whilst continuing to sail my old Southern Belle of course.
 
 Andrew
 
 
 
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 http://www.paddleducks.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?p=5665#5665
 
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Derek Warner

Honorary Secretary [Retired]
Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op
Australia
www.ils.org.au

ajg141

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Engel Typhoon
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2005, 10:53:23 PM »
Derek

The drive rod in the centre of the picture is attached to a motor inside the water tight compartment. When a signal is sent from the Tx the drive rod rotates moving a threaded bush along the rod. This bush (attached to the arms) in turn pushes or pulls the arms to the planes so that they can be retracted inside the hull. There is a micro-switch attached to this servo (the one that rotates the planes) so that this servo can only operate when the planes are fully extended. Stops at the motor end of the shaft permit a limited amount of travel for the threaded bush. Fine adjustment of all the links and careful initial positioning of the bush are essential for smooth operation of the set up. Hope this helps.

Andrew

frankmcneilll

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A Paddlewheel Submarine
« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2005, 09:06:18 AM »
Hi Andrew,

Would it be possible for you to fit construction of a submarine propelled by paddlewheels into your busy schedule? After much debate, a slightly plausible solution to what initially seemed a "pursuit of the impossible dream" may have been found. It is based on the design of WW1 fighter planes with radial engines that rotated around fixed-location crankshafts, so it might be necessary to break into a museum to obtain one of these engines. Go to "Research" for a long thread that finally ends with a brilliant solution to the apparently intractable problem— by me, of course. In order to achieve the fame that I deserve, someone who actually knows how to build a submarine— you, of course, will have to build and operate a paddlewheel submarine. Let me know when this can be done so I can devise a method to keep water from running into the sub's smokestack while still allowing the smoke to come out.

Best wishes,
Frank

 

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