Padleducks logo Paddleducks name

Welcome to Paddleducks..... The home of paddle steamer modelling enthusiasts from around the world.



+-

Main Menu

Home
About Us
Forum
Photo Gallery
Links
Contact Us

UserBox

Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
 
 
 
Forgot your password?

Search



Advanced Search

Author Topic: Bangladesh paddle vessels  (Read 7466 times)

Offline Roderick Smith

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1656
  • Gender: Male
Bangladesh paddle vessels
« on: June 10, 2007, 10:05:46 AM »
The rivers of Bangladesh form vital communication links, and are trafficked heavily with a wide range of ferries.  Most are not paddle.  World media focusses on the occasional/frequent sinkings.  In a Bangladesh context, these figures should be expressed relative to population, and compared with road tolls in other nations, not water ones.

The classy operator is Bangladesh Inland Waterways, which has a fleet including some stylish paddle vessels dating from the 1920s (when they built as paddlesteamers), used on longer journeys.  I cruised from Khulna to Dhaka, a 24 h journey, aboard PV Ostrich (the flagship).  The journey did take 36 h, as the captain hove to for the second night because of fog.

There are four ferries on the Dhaka - Khulna 'Rocket' service, all being paddlesteamers built in 1929, but now converted to diesel: PV Ostrich, PV Tern, PV Lepcha and PV (Masoud?, not seen).
As well, MV Sela (and others?), of similar style, ply a different route.

Enclosed: PV Lepcha and a river map.
Added 26.6.07: PV Tern

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor

Offline Roderick Smith

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1656
  • Gender: Male
PV Ostrich
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2007, 08:35:25 AM »
Here is the flagship of the Bangladesh Inland Waterways fleet: the largest and best appointed.
PS Ostrich was built in 1929 by Garden River Workshops, Calcutta.
Renovated and converted to diesel at Narayganj 1996.
The upper deck is in three zones:
Front, first class: a long dining saloon cum lounge, with an aspect to the foredeck; flanked on each side by the cabins, with access to the side promenade decks.  The lounge and cabins have beautiful panelling.  The kitchen is just to the rear of the saloon.
Centre, third class: a large open space with a snackbar for third class.
Rear, second class: kitchen leading, then an open dining saloon cum lounge, then two double rows of cabins, with the outer rows opening to promenade decks; toilets at the rear.

Lower deck: lots of cargo space, (and the crew accommodation?).  The former engine bay had become more open deck space for passengers and luggage.

First class was booked out, so I paid for sole occupancy of a second-class twin.  I had a cabin with an aspect to the port promenade deck.  I was able to wander through third class (I bought many cups of tea there), and through first class.  I was also able to visit the bridge.

Today I enclose two photos.
One is at Saderghat (the port for Dhaka) after arrival, at 11.44.  This port is on an anabranch of Padma River; I have not been able to trace its own name.
The other is at a typical wayside stop.  Unlike Myanmar, all were equipped with pontoon wharves.  This photo is undersize, and will have to be rescanned when time allows.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor

Offline Roderick Smith

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1656
  • Gender: Male
PV Ostrich - first class
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2007, 09:54:32 AM »
Interiors the first-class saloon, a cabin and the foredeck.  In this class, on PV Ostrich (but not on the others) cabins also have access to the side promenade decks.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor

Offline Roderick Smith

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1656
  • Gender: Male
PV Ostrich - second class
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2007, 08:13:25 AM »
Not as stylish as first class, but still quite comfortable and spacious.  The dining area was semi open; each cabin had a portable seat, which could be placed on the promenade deck for riverbank viewing.  I didn't see a Bengal tiger, but the opening part of the delta (through which we passed at sunrise) is one of their haunts.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor

Offline Roderick Smith

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1656
  • Gender: Male
PV Ostrich - third class & bridge
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2007, 08:11:18 AM »
More onboard aspects of PV Ostrich.
Although it is an old ferry, it does have modern instruments.  This is important, as the rivers are often fogbound.
I believe that the hooks on the walkway are for potplants.  This seems to be a tradition on most riverboats in Myanmar and Bangladesh.  In one of my earlier photos of PV Ostrich, you can see a whole tree near the wheelhouse.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor

Offline derekwarner_decoy

  • Paddleducks Supporter
  • Senior Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2553
  • Gender: Male
  • Wollongong - Australia
Bangladesh paddle vessels
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2007, 09:44:07 AM »
Hi PD's - I must admit liking the roof structure on this PV Ostrich....just like the old RED Rattler train carriages in NSW... you know, built  :hammer with huge camber & sealed with canvas & pitch - would certainly be needed in the Monsoons  :bravo

In our NSW trains, the windows always  :darn leaked, but never the roof  :hehe
Derek Warner

Honorary Secretary [Retired]
Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op
Australia
www.ils.org.au

Offline Roderick Smith

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1656
  • Gender: Male
PV Ostrich voyage
« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2007, 09:00:48 AM »
I have now completed the infill scans, and will retrofitting them to my earlier posts over the next few days.  I will also be updating the text to list the whole fleet.

This selection relates to an interesting incident of marine safety.  I was sitting on the first-class deck, posing for a photograph taken for me by a Japanese tourist.  Suddenly a cargo ship coming the other way turned across our bows and came alongside the bank.  There was no collision, but the turn had been made too close, in breach of marine regulations.  Our captain called for astern, we backed alongside the other.  Our crew, armed with batons, went aboard the other, seized its captain, and placed him in out brig to be taken to Dhaka and brought before the relevant marine-safety department.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor

Offline Roderick Smith

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1656
  • Gender: Male
An update
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2007, 09:56:03 AM »
Googling has revealed several items relating to BIWTC over 2004-06 lamenting the age of the fleet.  The paddle vessels are often out of traffic for repair, with MV Sela providing the backup on the Rocket service to Khulna.  At one stage, the service had to be cut to three services each way per week, but that was only temporary.

BIWTC is trying to obtain more-modern boats for this service, and is negotiating for the three passenger ferries owned by Bangladesh Railways.  These were being made redundant on their route by the completion of a new bridge.  However, there was a successful local protest to retain the ferry route.
For providing better passenger services for the people of southern region MV Sonargaon, from Bangladesh Railway, has already been procured. After necessary modification the vessel will put into Dhaka-Khulna Passenger Services. Successively, procurement of another two, MV Sohorawardi  and MV Sher-e-Bangla from BR is now under process.

The BIWTC site is www.biwtc.gov.bd (lots of information, particularly in the Notices section).

PV Lepcha has not yet been repaired after suffering collision damage (in 2006?).
The service is 6 days per week:
From Dhaka 18.30
MV Sela/PVTern Saturday / Tuesday
PV Masud Monday / Thursday
PV Ostrich Sunday / Wednesday

From Khulna 2.45
MV Sela/PVTern Monday / Thursday
PV Masud Saturday / Wednesday
PV Ostrich Thursday / Friday

In 2002, I rode on Sher Bangla [Bengal Tiger] on its BR route, and also photographed Sonargaon; neither is a paddle vessel.

I certainly advise adventurous Paddleduckers to head for Bangladesh soon (also nonadventurous ones, but in an escorted group).  In the words of one of the locals: 'We are a poor country, but we have a big heart'.  It is an immensely friendly country.  The obvious linkage is to make one holiday visiting Bangladesh and Myanmar (which has one paddlesteamer, and several MV which had been paddlesteamers).  IIRC there are direct flights to Dhaka from UK.  The other option is to hub via Bangkok: great for rest and recovery, and with its own immensely-busy river (wide variety of ferries, but not paddle ones).

For this concluding instalment of my Bangladesh coverage, I enclose a photo of MV Sela, mainly because it is so similar to the four paddleboats.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor

Offline Roderick Smith

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1656
  • Gender: Male
Re: Bangladesh paddle vessels
« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2021, 06:30:30 PM »
I am assembling my existing photos into my flickr account, bit by bit, and am adding new scans, and will rearrange them into a new link eventually.
This opening pair has assorted video links, to which I am still adding.
I have items from 2020 'fleet down to three', and 20021 'fleet down to one, running only to Barisal on one return trip per week, with new boats running other services'.

www.flickr.com/photos/13175590@N00/51379972905



 

Powered by EzPortal